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Your search for "prevention" returned 9 results.

Dentistry in the News: “Is Your Dentist Ripping You Off?”

…thor goes on to suggest some very useful and common sense ideas about how to evaluate if you’re getting the most for your money at the dentist’s office. My favorite point that he makes is about prevention: “Prevention saves a boatload of money. Brush, floss, and use your fluoride rinse…” Readers of this blog know that I completely agree. Prevention can keep costs down better than anything else. If you’re…

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Do dentists turn children away?

…. I’m not saying that it’s wrong to do so and I’m not saying that it is common. All I’m saying is the that the temptation to “overcode” can be there. All kids deserve healthy teeth! dental prevention: Most dental diseases, especially in children are 100% preventable. These programs are at their absolute best when they are used for prevention: specifically early childhood examination and education of good…

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Can medicine learn something from dentistry?

This article suggests that maybe it can.  The author brings up some very valid points about the lack of prevention in medical treatment.   Dentistry is all about prevention.  Regular visits to see the hygienist can reduce the time you need to spend in the dentist’s chair.  Most of the new technology that we use in our office (digital x-rays, magnification, hi res photography) is geared toward finding problems when…

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Dentistry in the News: “Why Your Dentist Costs So Much.”

…t I think it’s valuable. After reading the follow up article I come up with conclusions similar to the first article: Dentistry is expensive. No one* likes having to have dental work done. No one likes paying the bill. Prevention is MUCH less expensive than needing work. But having work done immediately is similarly less expensive than waiting if something is broken or it hurts. “Dental insurance” isn’t really like…

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How is gum disease like the Incredible Hulk?

…with the severe loss of bone and the supporting tissues of the teeth even after we’ve cleared up the inflammation of active gum disease. So, what’s the best way to prevent Bruce Banner from turning into the Hulk? Prevention! Don’t make him mad, right? Brushing, flossing and regular visits to the dentist can help you avoid the ravages of gum disease. Catching problems before they become destructive is the best, but even if you…

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Cleanings are overrated

…cash. The problem is that if the patient really wants to save money, she ought to skip the “cleaning” and keep up with the exams! If she wants to spend less money at the dentist’s office, her best bet is in prevention. Polishing your teeth doesn’t actually prevent problems. Polishing removes the biofilm on your teeth, but a biofilm re-develops in a matter of minutes. Polishing your teeth and making them minty fresh is…

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5 things you can do right now to have fewer cavities

…the title. Or send me an email at alan@meadfamilydental.com. I’m happy to answer any questions and appreciate your input. If you are looking for a dentist in Saginaw, MI we would love to see you! Just because you read all the way to the end of this post…I’m going to give you a bonus 6th thing to help you get less cavities. 6) Read my previous posts about prevention, saliva, chewing sugarless gum and flossing.  …

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athletic mouth guard season

…e required. Most athletes will never experience an “orofacial injury” while playing sports. The problem is that if it happens, it’s really bad news. According to the National Youth Sports Foundation for the Prevention of Athletic Injuries: Tooth and other dental injuries are the most common type of head and neck injury sustained during participation in sports. A tooth knocked out (complete avulsion) while playing sports is…

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Gum disease and heart disease, dental x-rays and brain tumors…what’s the link?

…e was firmly clarified by the AHA: “The message sent out by some in health care professions that heart attack and stroke are directly linked to gum disease can distort the facts, alarm patients and perhaps shift the focus on prevention away from well-known risk factors for these diseases.” Boom. That seems very clear to me. The statement continues: “Although periodontal interventions result in a reduction in systemic inflammation and endothelial…

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